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Every Author's Second Job

Updated: Oct 14, 2019


You have written a book! Congrats, you are a writer. If you want to be an author you have one more job to do. Market your book.

Once upon a time, this meant finding an agent who would sell your book to a publishing company who would do all your marketing for you. Now things aren't so easy. Luckily I have a few tips that I have collected from authors ranging from Annabelle Anders to Sabrina Jeffries.

1. A professional cover starts with a professionally edited blurb.

Everyone knows we all judge books by their covers. Your cover should clearly show what genre your story is in, and coordinate with other books under that pen name. If someone likes the cover they then read the blurb on the back. Many people don't realize that is it very hard to edit that blurb after your graphic designer is done. In fact, it is easier to change your novel text than your cover, so be careful.

2. Kickstart hype with free books.

Readers are most compelled to read your book when another person told them how great it was. You can start that hype before your book is even released. Share your ebook electronically with trusted reviewers such as friends and book bloggers. Indie author Holly Bush said, "The more books you give away, the more you sell."


3. Connect with readers early and often

Readers are everywhere. Reward them online with humor and sneak peeks. Meet with them at author signings, book fairs and themed events. A bookmark with your information is a simple and affordable marketing tool. Email lists are powerful because these are people who already like your stuff, and want more. The new rule of social media marketing is give, give, give, ask.

4. Your best advertising space is free.

What! How can that be so? But it is true. Your very best advertising space is the back pages of your last book. Never let that space go empty. At the very least jot down a title and two sentences about the idea in your head.

5. Professional editing pays dividends.

Some advertising venues will not accept novels that haven't been professional editing and gotten good reviews. Why limit yourself?


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